Herbalism is a traditional medicinal or folk medicine practice based on the use of plants and plant extracts. Herbalism is also known as botanical medicine, medical herbalism, herbal medicine, herbology, and phytotherapy. The scope of herbal medicine is sometimes extended to include fungal and bee products, as well as minerals, shells and certain animal parts. Pharmacognosy is the study of medicines derived from natural sources.

Traditional use of medicines is recognized as a way to learn about potential future medicines.

In 2001, researchers identified 122 compounds used in mainstream medicine which were derived from "ethnomedical" plant sources; 80% of these compounds were used in the same or related manner as the traditional ethnomedical use.

Plants have evolved the ability to synthesize chemical compounds that help them defend against attack from a wide variety of predators such as insects, fungi and herbivorous mammals. By chance some of these compounds whilst being toxic to plant predators turn out to have beneficial effects when used to treat human diseases. Such secondary metabolites are highly varied in structures, many are aromatic substances, most of which are phenols or their oxygen-substituted derivatives.

At least 12,000 have been isolated so far; a number estimated to be less than 10% of the total. Chemical compounds in plants mediate their effects on the human body by binding to receptor molecules present in the body; such processes are identical to those already well understood for conventional drugs and as such herbal medicines do not differ greatly from conventional drugs in terms of how they work. This enables herbal medicines to be in principle just as effective as conventional medicines but also gives them the same potential to cause harmful side effects. Many of the herbs and spices used by humans to season food yield useful medicinal compounds.

Similarly to prescription drugs, a number of herbs are thought to be likely to cause adverse effects. Furthermore, "adulteration, inappropriate formulation, or lack of understanding of plant and drug interactions have led to adverse reactions that are sometimes life threatening or lethal. Play it safe and seek drug rehabilitation advice if you feel your life is at threat.

This is a person who has trained in the medical sciences and so has a modern understanding of the health problems affecting people in today’s world however, instead of recommending drugs or surgeries, they carefully use plant-based medicines from traditions that span back thousands of years.

Medical herbalists see people from all ages and walks of life with all kinds of problems. The common factor in the people who benefit most from seeing a medical herbalist is that they have a chronic health problem that is not getting better by itself. Some practitioners specialise in certain areas but most medical herbalists have a wide range of experience in all kinds of conditions. If you are not sure, it is a good idea when you are making an enquiry for an appointment to ask if they have had positive experience in treating the issue you are seeking help with.

This exact nature of treatment will vary between practitioners but what you can expect is that you will more than likely be given herbal medicines in a liquid and/or tablet form to take on a daily basis for at least a few weeks or longer if needed. Every case is different but medical herbalists are holistic practitioners, they follow the ancient principles of working with the cause of illness wherever possible so, as well as herbs, there are a wide range of other areas that may get attention within an appointment.

Herbal medicines has a tremendous history of use that goes back many thousands of years. In that time we have taken great care to learn what works and how to use it safely. This knowledge has been passed down and a medical herbalist today has gone through extensive training in how to use herbs both safely and effectively.

Plants contain many powerful substances and will often have strong actions within the person who takes them as medicine. We encourage people to always make contact with their medical herbal practitioner if they are having any concerns about their treatment programme. If a member of the public has a negative experience with one of our members and does not feel they are being dealt with fairly then, under the rules of our association as well as the Health and Disability Act 2000, they are able to contact us directly to make a complaint.

No, the products are obtained only from selected plants for their effectiveness and safety degree. They do not have direct or indirect side effects (association with drugs or other).

Yes, certain products have specific instructions for use, as specified in the technical notes.

Yes, OJYA Herbal products are not meant for kids. But teenagers above the age of 15 years can use our products except hair colours.

Given the quality and concentration degree, the result is almost immediate. It should be underlined, however, that natural products do not work on the same principle of the drugs and therefore they need an average period of intake. This is the so-called "organic memory" process, triggered by the natural active principles. The ideal average period of intake is at least 8 weeks.

Phytocosmetics/Herbal Cosmetics refers to the production technique which employs, as characterizing ingredients, fresh extracts or plants. It differs from traditional cosmetics for the low content of synthetic preservatives and excipients, all to the benefit of the skin. The non-use of aggressive substances significantly lowers the levels of sensitivity or allergy.

No, OJYA Products do not contain products of animal origin.

OJYA Products are made with natural & organic plant extracts of Indian origin.

No, Herbal Products have a recommended time limit "Best before ..." after which the product can still be used without any side effects. Phyto-cosmetics, having a proven shelf life of more than 24 -36 months at the time of production and do have an expiry date.

Herbalism is a traditional medicinal or folk medicine practice based on the use of plants and plant extracts. Herbalism is also known as botanical medicine, medical herbalism, herbal medicine, herbology, and phytotherapy. The scope of herbal medicine is sometimes extended to include fungal and bee products, as well as minerals, shells and certain animal parts. Pharmacognosy is the study of medicines derived from natural sources.

Traditional use of medicines is recognized as a way to learn about potential future medicines.

In 2001, researchers identified 122 compounds used in mainstream medicine which were derived from "ethnomedical" plant sources; 80% of these compounds were used in the same or related manner as the traditional ethnomedical use.

Plants have evolved the ability to synthesize chemical compounds that help them defend against attack from a wide variety of predators such as insects, fungi and herbivorous mammals. By chance some of these compounds whilst being toxic to plant predators turn out to have beneficial effects when used to treat human diseases. Such secondary metabolites are highly varied in structures, many are aromatic substances, most of which are phenols or their oxygen-substituted derivatives.

At least 12,000 have been isolated so far; a number estimated to be less than 10% of the total. Chemical compounds in plants mediate their effects on the human body by binding to receptor molecules present in the body; such processes are identical to those already well understood for conventional drugs and as such herbal medicines do not differ greatly from conventional drugs in terms of how they work. This enables herbal medicines to be in principle just as effective as conventional medicines but also gives them the same potential to cause harmful side effects. Many of the herbs and spices used by humans to season food yield useful medicinal compounds.

Similarly to prescription drugs, a number of herbs are thought to be likely to cause adverse effects. Furthermore, "adulteration, inappropriate formulation, or lack of understanding of plant and drug interactions have led to adverse reactions that are sometimes life threatening or lethal. Play it safe and seek drug rehabilitation advice if you feel your life is at threat.